How Does Your Congressional District Feel About the Impeachment Inquiry?

How Does Your Congressional District Feel About the Impeachment Inquiry?

What does your congressional district mean for impeachment interest?

The Resonate platform uses artificial intelligence and machine learning, paired with the largest U.S. voter survey, to reveal a nuanced, real-time picture of the American electorate at the individual level. The Resonate Candidate Index predicts the rise and fall in positive content surrounding candidates in the Democratic primary. We’ve also launched the same technology to understand how voters in specific geographic areas are consuming media related to the impeachment inquiry.

To better understand the way that voters are consuming online media surrounding the impeachment inquiry, we tracked browsing on websites related to the term “impeachment”, and we weighted the value of the results based on the number of times that this word appeared in online media that voters were consuming in the weeks before and after the launch of the inquiry. Here are the results:

 

How Does Your Congressional District Feel About the Impeachment Inquiry?

The map above shows every congressional district in the U.S. Areas that are darkly represent higher-than-average engagement about impeachment. Areas with lower-than-average amounts of engagement are in lighter hues of green. Dark shades of green dominate the coastal cities and parts of the upper Midwest, which tend to vote Democrat. Lighter shades of green are more prevalent in areas of the lower mid-west and south that are historically associated with Republican voting patterns.

But has anything changed in other traditional media bubbles?

Resonate has done a lot of research on media bubbles. Our data revealed that congressional districts can have a lot to do with the media consumed and whether it leans left or the right. The data showed how much impeachment engagement there is in the mountain west. This is an area that is historically associated with the Republican party, but it’s experiencing a shift away from that behavior online. Whether this is due to changing demographics in these areas or some other reason, remains to be seen, but the level of engagement seen in places like Arizona, Nevada and Montana was surprising to our data scientists.

In tracking the engagement with democratic primary candidates, we’ve also seen that there’s been a general decline in engagement with all candidates. Clearly, the impeachment inquiry has taken over domination of the news cycle.

How will machine learning affect the 2020 election?

In the past, the Resonate Candidate Index has proven a useful tool in gauging post-debate lift or decline in how the voting public positively engages with a presidential candidate. It’s also an effective way to gauge interaction with political news stories.

Stay with Resonate throughout the 2020 election season for real-time, AI-driven updates on the Resonate Candidate Index and other related indices. AI-driven predictive analytics like these help campaigns discover new voter segments that the traditional voter file and third-party data analysis could never find.

Want to see the platform in action? Schedule a demo now and prepare to be floored.

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